Caring for the resistance

A meeting space for creative resistance and community, our month at SOEX included a number of workshops giving opportunities to stave off despair and fatigue and generate future collaborative actions.

2017

Strike a Pose of Resistance

We hosted photographer Jamil Hellu in setting up a station for green-screen protest posing. Silhouettes of participants became part of a wallpaper of protest action.

Attack of the Typewriters

Artist Hiya Swanhuyser brought a table full of typewriters and the addresses of the California congress for participants to write physical letters to their representatives, which has been shown to produce greater results.

Brave Minds Brunch

While the torrents of the season continued to blow, 100 Days Action invited artists and activists to a communal potluck. “We’ve marched and yelled together. Now let’s eat together, family-style. Let’s talk about what we’re doing, and hatch plans for future initiatives.”

Natural Resistance: A Grafting Workshop

We hosted the Guerilla Grafters for a hands-on workshop that examined the urban commons and sharing economy via grafting (stitching together living plants). Participants identified common ornamental trees and learned grafting techniques to turn city streets into food forests.

A Mending Workshop

The Mending Collective brought shared sensory, economic, and social experiences of mending together in a 3 hour workshop that moved through a variety of hand-mending techniques in a vibrant metaphor for self-care.

Wall of Song

Artists Mel Day and Michael Namkung spent 2017 building a different kind of wall—a Wall of Song. The artists invited friends and strangers to record a video singing singing Leonard Cohen’s ‘Hallelujah’, adding each voice to an ever-expanding composite of hundreds of others.

THE BUREAU OF LINGUISTICAL REALITY

This ongoing collaboration of Alicia Escott and Heidi Quante sets up in public spaces and invites participants to create new words for unnamed fears and aspirations. 100 Days collaborated to create our own word, Ilapnapan, which is “understanding seemingly disparate groups are intimately tied to each other in a way that is mutually binding for both parties’ survival.”